Archive for World War I

The Long Shots of Sarajevo

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on 28 June 2014 by delclem

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On 28 June 1914, the primal scene of the “short 20th century” (Hobsbawm) took place: the ATTENTAT / Sarajevo Assassination, when the Bosnian Serbian student Gavrilo Princip shot the Habsburg crown prince Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie. We organized an international on-site conference in Sarajevo and the proceedings were published in Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian and in German/English. Below, you can find a few links leading to our thematic photo albums:

>>Visual representations of the Attentat
>>Paraphernalia: the material culture of the Attentat
>>Places of memory of the Attentat
>>Shadow of a Gunman: Gavrilo Princip & Popular Culture

PS. Text by co-editor Vahidin Preljevic in BCS>>

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What if… the Germans had won WWI?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on 28 December 2013 by delclem

David Cameron at the graves of first world war soldiers in Tyne Cot cemetery in Zonnebeke, Belgium
“With the war’s centenary near, this is not a parlour game. Counterfactual
conjecture allows us to see the conflict far more objectively.” >essay
(c) THE GUARDIAN, 2013;    photo (c) Virginia Mayo/AP:
David Cameron visits the graves of WW1 soldiers in Zonnebeke, Belgium.

WHO OWNS ‘1914’ ?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on 16 November 2013 by delclem

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Nationalistic mud wrestling – or pan-European opportunity? The lobbying
is on for the WWI commemoration of Sarajevo in June 2014.

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1913 – The Year Before the Storm

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on 17 September 2013 by delclem

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“Can you write a history of the year 1913 and ignore the disaster waiting around the corner? With the centenary of the First World War approaching that may sound perverse, yet it is precisely what Die Zeit journalist Florian Illies tries to do in his new book, which was a bestseller in Germany when it was published there last year.” >review (c) THE GUARDIAN, 2013